DIY: Raised Bed Patio Planter

Here’s an AMAZING step-by-step on this project provided by Elizabeth K & Renegad3 Rogu3
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4hKfajEEqZDXzBJZk1qNGlzQkU/view?usp=sharing

Follow up videos
DiY: Raised Bed Green House – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tf3UWkluqk
Project Updates – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Cdc5lpYO9s

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Comments

TheBushdoctor68 says:

Great video. Short and precise.
Here’s a tip for next time: Put a layer of wooden logs and sticks at the bottom. It will retain a lot of water, save on soil and offer many other benefits like slow release of nutrients and food for compost worms. (It’s called ‘Hugelkultur’ with the difference that it’s contained in a grow bed).

Pink Stem Farm says:

Can I plant dahlias in this

Joanne Lee J.S. says:

instructions start at 1:30

We Are The Coleys says:

Can you please let me know what color stain you use? Thankd

estea says:

What?! High 50s? Had to rewind the video and listen again!! I’d freeze in the 50s. I want 72-80 degrees, that is it! Wow!

Nimble Pumpkin says:

1:28 is when she gets to the point, for those wondering.

SunshineLeclair says:

awesome, thanks for sharing 😉 If I use cedar wood, do I still need to line it? Would it last longer?

aconsideration1 says:

Love this. I think I’m making me one for my herbs 🙂 thank you.

peshpeshabdulla says:

You are so pretty

Christopher Thompson says:

4:25 drills screw into hand.

Fabiola Sheppard says:

This is so amazing, thanks so much for sharing!! Where can I get greenhouse plastic?

Belle Laine says:

What would the dimensions of the wood be in mm?

Pacific Hunter aka James Ryan says:

um what did she mean 64 degrees Celsius Fahrenheit or kelvin

Lindsay Thompson says:

Do you know how much this project costs?

Elizabeth K says:

I haven’t seen a pdf for this yet, so I took the time to take notes. I am the type of person that likes a print-out when I do a project, so I can check and triple check everything. I tried to be as faithful as possible, but I did make some notes for clarity, safety, and or improvements. Happy building!

Tools and Supplies:
Chop saw, safety glasses, and ear protection
Drill, drill bit (pilot holes), and spade bit (drainage holes)
Tape Measure
Pencil
Speed square (my recommendation!)
Staple Gun
sand paper (again my recommendation)
1-1/2″ screws (galvanized)
(4) wood feet or casters and top plates
liner
stain, brush, painter’s tarp, and gloves (unless you are a neat person…)
knife or scissors (to cut the liner)
potting soil
plants/seeds
work clothes, shoes, and means to secure hair (safety! Don’t have anything loose or dangly (hair, shirt, wallet chain) that can get caught in the saw or drill. Open toed shoes is asking for trouble. If in doubt, check a basic carpentry safety guide.)

Buy List, Lumber:
(4) 1″x6″x8′
(8) 1″x6″x6′
(2) 2″x3″x8′

Cut List, Lumber:
(8) 1″x6″x5′
(4) 1″x6″x22-3/4″
(4) 1″x6″x11-3/8″
(4) 1″x6″x5′ 1-1/2″
(3) 2″x3″x21-3/4″
(2) 2″x3″x10-1/4″
(2) 2″x3″x22″
(2) 2″x3″x17″

Note that lumber is sold in nominal dimensions, which aren’t the true dimensions. A 1×6 board is really a 3/4″x5-1/2″ board, and a 2×3 is really a 1-1/2″x2-1/2″ board. Take this into account when designing or modifying these plans!

Step One:
Cut the boards to the specified dimensions.

Step Two:
Set (2) of the 2x3x21-3/4 boards 5′ apart with the 2″ side facing down. Lay (4) 5′ boards across. Check that everything is square and flush with the top of the 2x3s, not that the boards will have an overhang at the bottom to accommodate the feet/casters. Drill the pilot holes, then screw to attach. Repeat with the third 2x3x21-3/4, centering it on the 5′ boards. The back section of the frame is complete.

Step Three:
Set (2) of the 2x3x22s about 3′ apart with the 3″ side facing down. Lay down the other (4) 5′ boards across. Check that everything is square and flush, then drill the pilot holes and screw the boards together. On the short sides, measure 2-1/2″ in and mark on both sides. There should be a 17″ gap between the marks. Line up (1) 2x3x17 with the marks, drill the pilot hole and screw to attach. Repeat with the other 2x3x17 on the other side. The bottom section of the frame is complete.

Step Four:
Flip the bottom piece to attach the back piece. Line up the back piece to the bottom piece, making sure everything is square and flush. Where the 5′ board of the back meets the 2x3s, drill the pilot hole, then screw together. Flip the frame and drill the pilot hole and screw through the 5′ boards into the 2x3s. The bottom and back sections are now attached.

Step Five:
Line up (1) 1x6x22-3/4 board to the outside edge of the frame, parallel with the bottom’s 2x3s. Square and flush the board, then drill the pilot holes and screw the board into the frame’s 2x3s. Square and flush (1) 2x3x10-1/4 to the end of the 22-3/4 board, pilot drill and screw to attach. Attach the next 22-3/4 board as above, then the (2) 1x6x11-3/8 boards. These last (2) boards will be wobbly until secured to the front of the frame. Repeat on the opposite side to finish attaching the sides.

Step Six:
With the frame right-side up, begin attaching the 5’1-1/2″ boards. Square and flush, then drill the pilot holes and screw to attach, using the 2x3s as the attaching point. The box is now complete, excepting the finishing touches.

Step Seven:
Flip the box, and attach the feet/casters to the bottom four corners per the accessories’s instructions. Flip the frame again to drill the drain holes. For her needs, she drilled (3) 1/2″ holes evenly spaced along the centerline of the box. Stain or paint the box per the instructions on the stain/sealant/paint. Make sure to get all of the cut edges to seal, and to let it dry before moving on! Insert the liner, making sure to tuck it into the corners of the box. A loose fit is better than a tight fit! Staple the liner to the inside edges of the boxes, then trim to fit. Push the liner through the drain holes, then pierce to allow drainage. For extra security, the edges of the liner can be stapled to the outside of the box.

Step Eight:
Situate the box in it’s final destination, then add soil. Prepare the box per the needs of the plants, and enjoy your new planter box!

At the end, Laura noted that she wished she used 2x4s for the bottom.

My observations prior to building this myself: use wood that hasn’t been chemically treated to prevent food contamination, use fish pond liner to further prevent chemical contamination, a small square of mesh and gravel over each drainage hole would prevent soil from draining out, use sandpaper over the cut edges to prevent splinters and sharp edges, staining before building makes it easier to get all of the cut edges, and ideally use wood that is naturally resistant to water damage for a longer-lasting build. I am glad I decided to browse around youtube prior to designing my own planter box, Laura (?) did a great job! I’l modify for the dimensions my space needs, but otherwise I don’t anticipate anything but satisfaction from this project. Thank you for the video! Again, I haven’t done the math, but prior to buying and cutting, double check! Nominal is not the true dimensions!

Jason Williams says:

wow this is great!

Donald F. Harshaw II says:

Wish I didnt have to replay the video over and over to get the measurements she used.

Angela Sur says:

This may have been asked, but what do you think about using landscape fabric instead of greenhouse plastic?

jango threat says:

terrible

Morkarga says:

My flower better

Wisam Abaas says:

nice

Harry Girgin says:

Nice design but you should counter sink your screws will look heaps better! Still great project though

Dominic Tibo says:

better work on you stainning technique cause it kinda suck .. rest is AWESOME

Talin Babayan says:

I have a question … what is the finished measurements? I haven’t seen it on the pdf or anything. Thank you. I’m guessing 2x5feet

Verona Warburton says:

Can you tell us which woodcutter you are using

Waqas Khan says:

which type of wood did you use?

itssugarfree says:

gah…all these feet and inches and things…when are you guys gonna catch up with the rest of the world and adopt metric?

Tony M says:

Great video. But are you sure the sizes are correct?
The instruction says
“On the short sides, measure 2-1/2″ in and mark on both sides. There should be a 17″ gap between the marks”.

So you are assuming the width is 22″, but 4 of the 1″x6″ put together should be 24″, right?

Gris Espino says:

Go Laura!!

Krysta Albert says:

I see some coments about the measurements being wrong. Is there a .PDF for this project? Also, do You think I could use repurposed wood for a rustic look?

Shanaynay O'keil says:

If I make the bottom thicker and make sure the wood wouldn’t get in touch with the water. How long would this gardening bed last?

Ace Rms says:

Why noy adding wheels instead of feet

yurday yasayan says:

Do you write mesuremend is cm weight and long i am not understand

Moondog9322 says:

I’m glad I stopped by….you’re cute! 🙂 Nice job, too!

JW Pookie says:

Awesome tutorial, couldn’t be any clearer, just needed to pause and write notes a few times. I hadn’t even thought of making a tiered raised bed, but hey, more square feet of planting area is nice.

Jeffrey hill says:

nice vid but 1 groan never have your hands behind some thing your screwing into you only need 1 over sized screw in the box and you don’t notice it . treat your self to some clamps

sandro make says:

beautiful work , I built a round flower box
in my video I show you how to build a planter with wood. Do you want to grow plants and keep your garden beautiful?
https://youtu.be/b6u0Ts2g5Z4

Sharon Triana says:

I tried this today and I have to say that the instructions have faults, as well as the project itself. My father is a professional carpenter/contractor and he was so frustrated while helping me make this! Lol. I’m just passing along his two cents. Either way thank you so much for the tutorial and inspiration. Mine came out awesome after some tweaks 🙂

Sherryl Keith says:

On the stodoys website you can count on professional help with problems with flames and technical problems.

royuncg2 says:

Will those screws hold up? They will probably rust and break

Ian And Lesyanne Gardner says:

Wow, 64 degrees in February, it’s the 25 July here and we hit 60

exhibitjean says:

What kind of wood did you use?

flavia ines monteiro varani says:

Você é das minhas, ponho a mão na massa!!!

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